Bar 2009 The proactive brain: memory for predictions

Today's Journal Club topic.

Bar 2009 The proactive brain: memory for predictions.
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 1235-1243

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19528004

It was my first time to read an article from this journal (PToRS?).
This paper is all about theoretical suggestion about the principle of how brain works that covers from perception/recognition to higher-order cognitive behaviours (such as scripts).

The author first proposes that rather than seeing the challenge of human vision as clarifying "what it is" (recognition of visually present objects/scenes), we should regard it as "what it is like", taking idea of analogy.

some keywords;
analogies, associations, predictions
LSF (low space frequency) information
default network of brain (activation pattern in rest state*)
overlap between major aspects of default network and context associative activation(Fig3) which included MPC/RSC, MTL and MPFC.
They claim that those default network activates continuously to keep trying to produce "predictions" which can be deduced from current available body of information at each time-point.


This hypothesis of "proactive brain" seems to explain large areas of cognitive aspects from rapid visual recognition (sometimes within 40ms from onset) to "scripts" of our chained behaviours while buying foods in a hamburger shop (The principle of the work by brain is to predict what comes in the next moment. Visual recognition can be reliant to blurred visual information made with low frequency components of what one sees which can be processed rapidly by the context-based predictions network prior to processing high frequency information (Fig.1).

The author also published a paper on scene perception and how it is contributed by contextual associations provided by parahippocampal cortex.

(See Bars 2008 Scenes unseen: the parahippocampal cortex intrinsically subserves contextual associations, not scenes or places per se. Journal of Neuroscience, :8539-8544. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18716212)
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